Pinterest. The new exciting web service…

Pinterest lets you organize and share all the beautiful things you find on the web. People use pinboards to plan their weddings, decorate their homes, and organize their favorite recipes.

Best of all, you can browse pinboards created by other people. Browsing pinboards is a fun way to discover new things and get inspiration from people who share your interests.

Redecorate your Home!

Joy uses Pinterest to save decorating ideas for her new home in LA. She saves patterns, furniture, and accessories that catch her eye.

Plan a Wedding!

Divya and Ben use Pinterest to plan their wedding. Their Moms can leave comments about the dresses, flowers, and ties they pin up.

Find your Style!

Tim uses Pinterest to share his personal style. He pins clothing, shoes and accessories he finds while browsing stores and fashion blogs.

Save your Inspirations!

Sha uses Pinterest to save design inspirations for his job. He can reference inspiring design work to share with his team at Trulia.

Save Your Recipes!

Jessica uses Pinterest to discover new gluten free recipes. She always has a collection of tasty appetizers and desserts she can cook when she’s hungry and looking for ideas.

 

 http://pinterest.com/didierlahely/

SHOPPING (Buy my products online)
My Pinterest

My Pinterest boards

The Zoho Notebook

What a Tool!

ZOHO Notebook is definitely a good idea to share your contents on the web. It’s almost a website building service if you know how to manage all your stuff and a bit of knowledge (Embedded codes, Url, Rss links etc.).

You can build how many Notebooks you want. Showing your portfolio as a designer and be able to share it with collaborators or contacts is a great possibility for example, working on the same document is another one; well, it depends really on your ability to find ideas that suits your needs. But the tools are there. Waiting for your imagination…

ZOHO Notebook (Click to see it LARGE)

Check one of mine:

Didier LAHELY • Creative Director • Graphics – Zoho Notebook.

“Slow Motion Dog” Ad. Now, THAT is creative… But…

➜ 1

We (creative people) and you (all the others) often don’t have the same idea on WHAT is creative.

You can say you are but who can really define creativity right? When I mean creative, it’s for me, far, very far from the “average” ads done for the mass consumers and 50 years old housewives. (not that they don’t deserve ads too…).

A Creative Ad is an ad that touch the target of the product (or service) to buy. Touch because it’s relevant, because it’s so funny that you would want to make YOURSELF the buzz around you (and become the ambassador of the brand… ; ), because it’s shocking, whatever, it has to move you, in a good way. Very rarely it has to make you think. But that’s an other debate.

A creative ad, you would like to be part of it; in showing it to people, it’s a bit like you did it yourself, or, at least, you show and tell WHO you are, this person that really love this ad. Follow me…?

Then, for the best of us, we will remember this brand, its values. (at least the ones they want you to believe). And hopefully, BUY it in the supermarket for our puppydoggytinypet!

Bravo Pedigree…

Slow Motion Dog Treat Commercial Beguiles Internet [Randomly Viral].

Article from MashableBrenna EHRLICH

For some reason, a Pedigree commercial featuring dogs leaping through the air in super slow motion has taken the Internet by storm, appearing on multiple video-sharing sites and racking up the YouTube views.

According to Creativity Online, the video was shot with a Phantom camera at 1,000 frames per second, which explains the underwater-like quality of this viral commercial. Director Bob Purman explains the spot thusly:

“The ‘Catch’ spot was to be a series of shots of dogs looking with anticipation as a piece of dog food is flying through the air towards them. We shot close-ups of the dogs at 1000 fps. The result was really wonderfully anthropomorphic. The super slow motion really captured this intense sense of desire in the dogs’ eyes. To me it was equal parts awe inspiring and hilarious to see so rich a palate of personality in a dog’s facial expressions. A few days after the shoot I started to get emails from Mark, Steph and the editor Chris Parkins with the different iterations of the spots cut to different music selections, all of them interesting for different reasons. But then they put footage from the two spots together to form this new greater whole that really exploits the dynamics of the dogs’ athleticism and their emotive personality in slowed time.”

Well, that’s all very inspiring and poignant and whatnot, but the reason behind why this vid has become so popular is quite simple, really. In fact, it can be boiled down to a rudimentary mathematical equation (get out your notebooks, kids):

Cute dog + Silly activity/article of clothing/amusing prop = Viral Gold


From CREATIVITY-ONLINE:

Playing catch the Phantom camera way

Director Bob Purman used a Phantom camera at 1,000 fps to capture these expressive canines in action.

The director was initially charged with shooting two spots, a “Catch” and a “Jump” execution. The director says: “The ‘Catch’ spot was to be a series of shots of dogs looking with anticipation as a piece of dog food is flying through the air towards them. We shot close-ups of the dogs at 1000 fps. The result was really wonderfully anthropomorphic. The super slow motion really captured this intense sense of desire in the dogs’ eyes. To me it was equal parts awe inspiring and hilarious to see so rich a palate of personality in a dog’s facial expressions. A few days after the shoot I started to get emails from Mark, Steph and the editor Chris Parkins with the different iterations of the spots cut to different music selections, all of them interesting for different reasons. But then they put footage from the two spots together to form this new greater whole that really exploits the dynamics of the dogs’ athleticism and their emotive personality in slowed time.”

Full Credits

Agency:
TBWA, Toronto
Client:
Pedigree
Creative Director:
Mark Biernacki
Copywriter:
Mark Biernacki
Creative Director:
Steph Mackie
Art Director:
Steph Mackie
Producer:
Margaret John
Sound:
Joey Serlin
Editor:
Chris Parkins
Flame Artist:
Mike Bishop
Director:
Bob Purman
Director of Photography:
Bob Purman
Production Company:
Imported Artists Film Company

Date Feb 22, 2010

Category TVC



➜ 2

Is this Plagiarism?

See the same shot here: http://www.joelapompe.net/2010/02/24/dogs-slow-motion-pedigree-catch/

As one comment say: “plagiarism is the new creativity pass it on“…


➜ 3

Well, what David OGILVY was saying?

Here are some quotes… ; )

  • “If it doesn’t sell, it isn’t creative.”
  • “The best ideas come as jokes. Make your thinking as funny as possible.”

2009 HUDSON reports

These are the latest reports from HUDSON about Hiring, HR trends in Asia; salary in advertising and communications fields.

I’ve made a special ISSUU about it. But To view directly The Hudson Report results and analysis, please click here.

______________________________________

The Hudson Report Quarter Four, 2009

Hiring expectations continue to rise at an accelerating rate. Overall, expectations are higher than they were a year ago and it now seems that the ‘green shoots’ are here to stay.

Mark Carriban, Managing Director – Asia

Highlights include:

  • Hiring expectations are rising sharply and this survey of nearly 500 executives across key business sectors shows that 35% forecast headcount growth in Quarter Four (Q4) 2009, up from 22% in Q3;
  • Hiring expectations are rising faster in Hong Kong than in the other markets surveyed in Asia;
  • Across all the sectors surveyed, respondents say that talent development and improving staff retention are their key HR priorities for 2010;
  • One-third of respondents say they would employ someone who has been out of work for more than a year;
  • Where employers are prepared to hire the long-term unemployed, previous experience and track record are given as the principal reasons;
  • Respondents in the Consumer, IT&T and Manufacturing & Industrial sectors are more confident about finding local talent for senior positions than those in Banking & Financial Services, Legal and Media/PR/Advertising.

Mark Carriban
Managing Director, Asia
Hudson

AIGA – "What is graphic design?"

AIGA, the professional association for design, stimulates thinking about design, demonstrates the value of design and empowers the success of designers at each stage of their careers. AIGA’s mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force. Founded in 1914, AIGA remains the oldest and largest professional membership organization for design, and is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) educational institution.

What is graphic design?

Article from AIGA Career Guide

Suppose you want to announce or sell something, amuse or persuade someone, explain a complicated system or demonstrate a process. In other words, you have a message you want to communicate. How do you “send” it? You could tell people one by one or broadcast by radio or loudspeaker. That’s verbal communication. But if you use any visual medium at all—if you make a poster; type a letter; create a business logo, a magazine ad, or an album cover; even make a computer printout—you are using a form of visual communication called graphic design.

Graphic designers work with drawn, painted, photographed, or computer-generated images (pictures), but they also design the letterforms that make up various typefaces found in movie credits and TV ads; in books, magazines, and menus; and even on computer screens. Designers create, choose, and organize these elements—typography, images, and the so-called “white space” around them—to communicate a message. Graphic design is a part of your daily life. From humble things like gum wrappers to huge things like billboards to the T-shirt you’re wearing, graphic design informs, persuades, organizes, stimulates, locates, identifies, attracts attention and provides pleasure.

Graphic design is a creative process that combines art and technology to communicate ideas. The designer works with a variety of communication tools in order to convey a message from a client to a particular audience. The main tools are image and typography.

Image-based design
Designers develop images to represent the ideas their clients want to communicate. Images can be incredibly powerful and compelling tools of communication, conveying not only information but also moods and emotions. People respond to images instinctively based on their personalities, associations, and previous experience. For example, you know that a chili pepper is hot, and this knowledge in combination with the image creates a visual pun.

In the case of image-based design, the images must carry the entire message; there are few if any words to help. These images may be photographic, painted, drawn, or graphically rendered in many different ways. Image-based design is employed when the designer determines that, in a particular case, a picture is indeed worth a thousand words.

Type-based design
In some cases, designers rely on words to convey a message, but they use words differently from the ways writers do. To designers, what the words look like is as important as their meaning. The visual forms, whether typography (communication designed by means of the printed word) or handmade lettering, perform many communication functions. They can arrest your attention on a poster, identify the product name on a package or a truck, and present running text as the typography in a book does. Designers are experts at presenting information in a visual form in print or on film, packaging, or signs.

When you look at an “ordinary” printed page of running text, what is involved in designing such a seemingly simple page? Think about what you would do if you were asked to redesign the page. Would you change the typeface or type size? Would you divide the text into two narrower columns? What about the margins and the spacing between the paragraphs and lines? Would you indent the paragraphs or begin them with decorative lettering? What other kinds of treatment might you give the page number? Would you change the boldface terms, perhaps using italic or underlining? What other changes might you consider, and how would they affect the way the reader reacts to the content? Designers evaluate the message and the audience for type-based design in order to make these kinds of decisions.

Image and type
Designers often combine images and typography to communicate a client’s message to an audience. They explore the creative possibilities presented by words (typography) and images (photography, illustration, and fine art). It is up to the designer not only to find or create appropriate letterforms and images but also to establish the best balance between them.

Designers are the link between the client and the audience. On the one hand, a client is often too close to the message to understand various ways in which it can be presented. The audience, on the other hand, is often too broad to have any direct impact on how a communication is presented. What’s more, it is usually difficult to make the audience a part of the creative process. Unlike client and audience, graphic designers learn how to construct a message and how to present it successfully. They work with the client to understand the content and the purpose of the message. They often collaborate with market researchers and other specialists to understand the nature of the audience. Once a design concept is chosen, the designers work with illustrators and photographers as well as with typesetters and printers or other production specialists to create the final design product.

Symbols, logos and logotypes
Symbols and logos are special, highly condensed information forms or identifiers. Symbols are abstract representation of a particular idea or identity. The CBS “eye” and the active “television” are symbolic forms, which we learn to recognize as representing a particular concept or company. Logotypes are corporate identifications based on a special typographical word treatment. Some identifiers are hybrid, or combinations of symbol and logotype. In order to create these identifiers, the designer must have a clear vision of the corporation or idea to be represented and of the audience to which the message is directed.

Graphic Design: A Career Guide and Education Directory
Edited by Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
Copyright 1993
The American Institute of Graphic Arts